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FAA Registration is no more!

Discussion in 'Safety & Regulation' started by 94Z28, May 19, 2017.

  1. 94Z28

    94Z28 Active Member

    Squirrel1138 likes this.
  2. DuaneM

    DuaneM Drone? I don't see any drone ... crap!

    I think people should do it anyway, never know, someone might find you through this program and return your lost drone!
     
  3. 94Z28

    94Z28 Active Member

    Your right about returns but the downfall I see is that if something happens in your area like some unregistered guy crashes into someone and flys off.. they're gonna come talk to you because your registered.

    Nonetheless I feel it's good for them to be able to hold people accountable for their actions, although I don't really agree with a "Registry"; if only people were mature enough to have common sense and fly safe and smart it wouldn't be neccesary. Some new rules and regulations will replace it eventually because of the bad eggs.
     
  4. Jackson

    Jackson USA member at large

    Really? Have you seen the current president of the U.S.? :)
     
    Roger EWing likes this.
  5. DuaneM

    DuaneM Drone? I don't see any drone ... crap!

    LOL! @ Jackson!

    I have my name, phone number and address on my drone right beside my registry number. That way the insurance agent knows who to sue.
     
  6. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member

    Fascinating. The bottom-rung quads are derided here as "toys" compared to "hobby" quads. But go to court to oppose registration with the FAA, and the more expensive quads suddenly become "toys" in the courtroom, according to their owners.... I wonder if FAA attorneys monitor these forums and other social media, just to see what contradictory statements they can introduce in court?
     
  7. QuadKid

    QuadKid Noth'in Like a Flat Top

    No need to register is true if you are flying only pleasure and personal, most homeowners insurance will cover you and your quad only ( no liability/property damage coverage for what you do while flying )
    I fly commercially (Part 107 ) as well as recreational, purchased Aviation insurance for my business ($1 million in errors & omissions, personal/property liability, $3,000 in hull (drone damage coverage), $5,000 medical), reasonably cheap at $650 annual, lots of peace of mind should my DJI fall from the sky into someones Ferrari !
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2017
    Chuck likes this.
  8. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member

    The bigger concern regarding the majority on non-pro quad flyers from the standpoint of many who don't fly them, is the potential "Peeping Tom". The guy who buys them with or equips them with FPV capability, to spy on women and kids in the bathroom or bedroom two, three, or more floors up from street level, or in the backyard. As for the idiots that fly them over a forest fire, massive traffic accident, or police hostage situation to get a "ringside seat", they are the drone piloting equivalent of the idiots that will drive out to these same locations to watch up close, and not only get in the way, in the instense of the traffic accident, snarl traffic that could otherwise pass by in the opposite direction. Then get upset when the police order them to leave, or face prosecution for the appropriate violations.
     
  9. QuadKid

    QuadKid Noth'in Like a Flat Top

    The FAA received about 180 comments on the NPRM raising concerns about the
    potential impacts of small UAS operations on privacy. Most commenters expressed support
    for UAS integration and recognized the many benefits of this technology across diverse
    industries, but commenters discussed concerns regarding personal privacy, data privacy,
    private property rights and intellectual property rights.

    Although the FAA regulates the safe and efficient operation of all aircraft within
    the NAS, the FAA has never extended its administrative reach to regulate the use of
    cameras and other sensors extraneous to the airworthiness or safe operation of the aircraft
    in order to protect individual privacy.

    The University of North Georgia commented that privacy
    concerns are minimal provided flights are operated in accordance with FAA rules, and
    images are acquired from 300 feet or above and are not obtained using facial recognition
    technology.

    Overall, the comments demonstrate a lack of consensus regarding the extent to
    which UAS integration poses potential risks for privacy intrusions, how privacy concerns
    should be addressed, and the FAA’s role in efforts to address these concerns. In response,
    the FAA notes that its mission is to provide the safest, most efficient aerospace system in
    the world, and does not include regulating privacy.

    None of the UAS-related provisions of Public Law 112-95 directed the FAA to
    consider privacy issues when addressing the integration of small UAS into the airspace, or
    mandated the inclusion of privacy considerations in the UAS Comprehensive Plan.

    Privacy Issues are regulated by State & Local agencies, for example in my State & County

    Members of the public have a very
    limited scope of privacy rights when
    they are in public places. Basically,
    anyone can be photographed without
    their consent except when they have
    secluded themselves in places where
    they have a reasonable expectation of
    privacy such as dressing rooms, restrooms,
    medical facilities, and inside
    their homes
     
  10. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member

    That is the general view that the courts have taken across the country. The concern is in regard to what is regarded as the limit of "being in public". You have that reasonable expectation of privacy in your backyard, when you erected an eight-foot solid wood fence to keep casual passerbys on the street from watching you and your family and friends sunbathing. But what about that quad that your neighbor flies at an altitude of seventy-five-to-one hundred fifty feet, well within the FAA-imposed maximum limit of four hundred feet? He's not physicslly up there, but that 3-D gimballed camera still makes it easy for him to look down and see what you all are doing. And doing so without your consent. Not everybody is so inclined, but what about the ones who are? What are your legitmate claims to privacy from above the roof of your home? Or even that eight-foot fence? Is his viewing from that altitude just an extension of what he could see in your yard, looking down from his own bedroom window on the second floor?
     
  11. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member

    As for Trump, I'm fairly certain that being a developer, he and his company have explored the use of drones for company purposes, just to stay ahead of the competition. Like just about all of his competitors. So he's unlikely to favor any regulations that will hamper his operations, once he leaves office. Whether that is in four years or eight. And that is something that applies to every President that has had business interests prior to, or after holding office. Regardless of party affiliation.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2017
  12. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member

    Okaaaaay....
     
  13. DuaneM

    DuaneM Drone? I don't see any drone ... crap!

    I should probably stick to the message title. I forgot what thread I was in.
     
  14. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member

    It started out about FAA registration coming to a halt for now....
     

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