Folding Suitcase drone made out of wood.

Discussion in 'Frame Design' started by DIY Drone, Oct 7, 2015.

  1. DIY Drone

    DIY Drone Active Member

    This is going to be called the Suitcase drone. (finally figured out why everyone calls them 250 class), Guess mine is a 304 mm class drone. I am calling it this because of the shaped of the handle on top. I have never made a folding drone before. I thought that by making it out of wood it would not only look really cool, but the reason I used wood was because it was the only material I had on hand without having to order any acrylic.
    The plan is to use to 935kv motors, 20 amp skinny blheli escs, 6 channel receiver, 8045 props. The total weight should come in around 1200 grams. I can fly a drone that weights that much with the same dimensions. It is in the very beginning stages. I am using foam to create friction between the motor arms and the body plates. This has worked out pretty good so far. It keeps the arms straight and rigid enough, yet it does not affect it when putting the arms into the folded position. Using nylon studs as supports keeps the weight down.
    The wood was cut out by a bandsaw and sanded into their relative shapes. A drill press was used to drill out the holes.
    So far all that is built is the frame. I am waiting on some more parts to come in the mail. Should be a good design if it flies.

    [​IMG]

    It all starts with a program called Inventor. First thing to do is make the 3D model to work out any conflicts or bugs.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    After I put on the finish and have all the parts close to fitting, it will get assembled. The next step is too layout all the components to see how they will fit on a new design.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Look for the finished product flying soon.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2015
    GJH105775 likes this.
  2. GJH105775

    GJH105775 Avid Linux User, and U.S. Air Force 1C6x1 Moderator

    That is REALLY nice, the main concerns are strength and weight. I am very interested in this haha. Can it fold up with props on (probably best NOT to have props on haha), but that would be appealing. I love how the handle protects the electronics, does it have landing skids or feet?
     
  3. DIY Drone

    DIY Drone Active Member

    The weight so far with just the frame and hardware is 367 grams. It should fold up with the props on. The wood when finished with laquer has proven to be pretty strong. The shaker pegs on the bottom are rubber coated. I'll post a picture tomorrow of it with the new legs on. Thanks for the replies.
     
  4. GJH105775

    GJH105775 Avid Linux User, and U.S. Air Force 1C6x1 Moderator

    That all sounds perfect haha. What type of wood are you using for the thinner parts? Also for 935 k/v motors you might want to use 10'' props or move to 1000 k/v motors to get the best performance (assuming you are using 3S) .
     
  5. HDtallrider

    HDtallrider Well-Known Member

    That really is a cool design! I like working with wood as well. Been trying to help GJH105775 see the light....... :rolleyes: I do agree with his suggestion on the motors/props. One suggestion I have is to look into using basswood 1/8" sheets and 1/2" square dowels. Basswood is amazingly strong and very light weight. I have made 600mm quads out of the stuff. I would guess you could shave 100g's, or more, off your frame. I have also found that strategic placement of the standoffs really increases rigidity. On your design, for example, I would suggest adding stand offs at each corner of the top plate and adding 4 between the bottom and middle plate at the 1/3 and 2/3 marks. Aluminum would be better than nylon for those. It's kinda like trusses on a bridge. For even more strength use spruce. The only thing stronger is carbon fiber! One more thing. Make sure the "wheelbase" is square. I couldn't tell from your photo's. It will fly much better. Really, really good looking quad you got there!
     
  6. DIY Drone

    DIY Drone Active Member

    Oak planned down to 1/4". Then I take an overhead drum sander from Performax and sand it down to 3/16". The top is Pine tooled the same way. I would like to get bigger motors, but my budget won't let me buy what I need. I have to use the 935kv because that is all I have laying around. I am going to use the 3s. I did buy a 3s 4000. I found some simonk 20 amp from newer, might add those in instead of the skinny's. My brakes on my car are making noise so I may not get it too this weekend. I may have to change them out. What I like about this design is that it could be substituted for any material. I just don't have a way to cut anything except wood and acrylic. Imagine what could be done with a 3d printer using the same type of frame. (dreaming big). Do you think anyone would buy a kit frame made like this? I sold one set of plans this week.

    Thanks for the reply. The legs are sprayed in rubber coating from krylon, going to experiment with this. I learned from the black bug that anything that is sharp on the landing gear likes to stick when taking off. That is why I want to try the rubber coated shaker pegs. The weight is less than HK's diy landing gear. gives me about 4 inches from bottom of the frame to the ground. I wish there was a way to cut carbon fiber with a bandsaw. lol Hard enough cutting acrylic dulls the sharpness of the blades. If you look really close you will see a design modification I made while putting it together I didn't catch in Inventor. Using a piece of dense foam between the arms, and having the arm ride tight against the lower body, gives me a lot more rigidity. The nylon lock nuts are a must to keep them from vibrating out. That is why I like designing these things because you always have a glitch or two here or there that you don't always catch until you build it. Drilling the holes out in the arms will allow me to snake the motor leads in and out, giving it a clean appearance. You learn so much from building these things. I want to try pixhawk next when I get rich. lmao.
     
  7. HDtallrider

    HDtallrider Well-Known Member

    Instead of different motors get larger props. If you can't fit 10" try 9055. I would beware of the Newer ESC's. They may be Newer but the design is Older...... Sorry, sorry......Sometimes I can't help myself. My favorite inexpensive ESC's are ZTW Spider 30A small. They are programmed right out of the package. Need no programming. Operate at 600hz. Weigh only 11g and can be found for around $11.00 or so. Perform well above their price point. Don't forget to balance your props. Once again, great looking quad.
     
  8. GJH105775

    GJH105775 Avid Linux User, and U.S. Air Force 1C6x1 Moderator

    You cut CF with an abrasive, and treat it like metal or masonry. But you need to make sure you have the proper PPE before attempting it as the fine particles won't do you any good.


    You make any fixed wing stuff from wood? hahaha
     
  9. HDtallrider

    HDtallrider Well-Known Member

    Fixed wing?? Blasphemy!
     
  10. GJH105775

    GJH105775 Avid Linux User, and U.S. Air Force 1C6x1 Moderator

    Hahahaha.
     
  11. HDtallrider

    HDtallrider Well-Known Member

    I think your idea of a kit has merit. If you do go that route consider the basswood for the sheets( very lightweight and resistant to tearing along the grain). The 1/2" Sitka spruce dowels are actually cap strips from Aircraft Spruce and Specialty and only 10% heavier than basswood. Perfect grain. Very straight and ounce for ounce stronger than anything we use in the quad hobby except CF. Would be lighter and stronger than your current materials. Less labor intensive as well. Would only cost about $.50 to replace an arm. You could also consider aluminum or CF ready made motor mounts. Maybe aluminum for the landing skids. Light and easy to bend back in shape. Just throwin' stuff at the wall....... I say go for it. You don't often get to have fun and make money too! Check these guys out as an example of taking wooden quads to market;

    http://quadlugs.com/collections/frame-kits
     
  12. DIY Drone

    DIY Drone Active Member

    oh to get my hands on a 3d printer. The sky would be the limit literally. As to fixed wings my very first balsa was a control line batwing. Anyone remember those?
    Foam is now the staple for fixed wings. Unless your using weed wacker motors. :)
    I see what the wood guy did was to mix printed parts with wood. I like it.
     
  13. HDtallrider

    HDtallrider Well-Known Member

    I got my start in control line as well. My favorite was the Ringmaster. My first RC plane had a single channel "pulse" radio I assembled from a Allied Electronics kit. I could only turn right. Quads are a looong way from that! Glad you liked the link. Some interesting stuff going on out there.
     
  14. DIY Drone

    DIY Drone Active Member

    I found a material that is light as wood and strong as carbon fiber to make these drone designs out of. The CNC is lined up to cut these out. These will come with custom aluminum studs with brass knurled inserts that accept a 3mm screw. The lead out time for the production is 3 weeks before I can get the first run cut and shipped out. Plan to sell these as kits for $60.00. The weight with all the hardware attached will be 500 grams. This will fall into the 430mm class. This kit will include directions on how to assemble and dissemble it, recommended hardware and equipment, along with beginning PI settings. If someone wants a kit already built contact me for more information. I may sell complete RTF kits if there is an interest.
    Now we can have drones that are beautiful, appealing to the eye, and with the strength of carbon fiber. These drones are neat in design and simple to fold up. The handle will provide a secure method to carry it, and at the same time protect the FC. The speed controllers are neatly packed away. The entire drone can be dissembled and assembled to add new components. There is room to add FPV and other accessories.
    Fly something you can be proud of and easy to learn on without worrying about breaking parts in a crash or mistake made by the pilot.
    Kitting these will mean there will always be parts available. The plan is to sell just motor mounts as packs because of the strength of this material.

    [​IMG]
    This is the first prototype made out of oak and pine. I put lights on it that are powered from the receiver. What you see is a flying design with custom made landing gear.
    [​IMG]
    This is showing it folded up. See how neat it is. The taller FC board protects the props. The longer arms keeps it from hitting the ends.
    [​IMG]
    This is the new material I cut out on the bandsaw. This is a very strong and durable design.
    [​IMG]
    This the Drone shown without the assembled studs. Folded up.
    [​IMG]
    This shows the drone ready for equipment. The total weight of this image is 500 grams.

     
  15. GJH105775

    GJH105775 Avid Linux User, and U.S. Air Force 1C6x1 Moderator

    Looks great.
     
  16. HDtallrider

    HDtallrider Well-Known Member

    Looking good!! Don't forget us little guys when you're rich and famous.....;)
     

Share This Page