Painting RTF quads.

Discussion in 'RTF Modification & Repair' started by Chuck, Jul 2, 2017.

  1. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member

    Has anybody tried any of the commercially available paint pens on quad outer bodies? Along with the FAA-required registration number, I want to apply some "nose art" as has been done historically on USAAF, and USAF combat aircraft, since World War II. I've already "Googled" examples of art using these pens, but none was applied to quads or R/C aircraft.
     
  2. GrannyApple

    GrannyApple Member

    Most R/C guys use decals or if theyre creative theyll airbrush/spray cans. Cant see how youll be able to use paint pens as theyre mostly used for paper or canvas so it wont work with a plastic/carbon body.

    I think details are you best option unless you already know how to paint. What quad do you want to paint
     
  3. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member

    A JJRC H25G. I plan to use spray cans for the camouflage paint job. The paint pens are intended for World War II-style "nose art", and the FAA registration number. Both of which will be oversprayed with a clear coat for preservation.
     
  4. yay

    yay Well-Known Member

    prolly means "decals" not "details" :)

    my considered reply to this thread back when it was posted,
    paint is traditionally applied with a brush.. technology which conveniently provides a variety of line widths et c. check hobby stores or gaming stores for little bottles of enamel, cleans up easy with alcohol, might not be too pricey, and might still be in serviceable condition a year later if cleaned and closed up proper like. some of your wife's nail polish and a whittled toothpick :)

    i remember the water based miniatures paints being pretty hefty as well.
     
  5. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member

    I have experience with model paints in both brush and spray aplication. They cover well, but are not made for outdoor use, and will not last long in the rough environment of drone landings and occassional contact with tree leaves. I'm inclined to paints formulated for outdoor furniture, ironwork, etc. That go on in thin but tough coates, require minimal masking, and are inexpensive. Most are available in gloss, semi-gloss, satin, or flat tones similar to traditional aircraft colors.
     
  6. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member

    Also. Outdoor paints tend to be less expensive, considering that they are produced and sold in greater quantities. So I can paint several quads in similar colors more economically.
     
  7. GrannyApple

    GrannyApple Member

    Also forgot about hydro dripping. Check YouTube. Camos can easily be done with this.
     
  8. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member

    "Hypo dripping"???
     
  9. GrannyApple

    GrannyApple Member

    It's basically paint that collects on the surface of water. As you dip whatever into it it will stick to the surface with the same pattern.


     
  10. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member

    Interesting. But the problem is that with that method, there is no control over the pattern applied, plus I want the pattern to be in specific colors, in specific sizes to the pattern, and in specific locations on the fuselage like these. Something that would be easier to accomplish with spray cans and masking tape. b52-2.jpg marshac130w.jpg
     
  11. yay

    yay Well-Known Member

    i was curious :)
    [​IMG]

    all nice work. those look more like handwork than spray to me, maybe airbrush? get it done! :)
     
  12. mozquito1

    mozquito1 Summer's over, where's my thumbless gloves

    It's a plastic film not paint.
    Can be done without water.
    Although it does a better job with.
    Just a pain taking the guts out of everything.
     
  13. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member

    Nice. But the pattern on the firearms is too fine for my intended application. I'm replicating the larger patterns used on USAF combat aircraft.
     
  14. mozquito1

    mozquito1 Summer's over, where's my thumbless gloves

    What about some funny shape cutout templates & spray them. Gotta be easier than hand painting. Grey Base then add the shapes over that.
     
  15. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member

    Oh, I wasn't planning to paint with a brush. Too time-consuming. No, I'm looking at spraying a base shade of green, then masking off and spraying each additional color where appropriate. After that all dries. Adding the intended identifier markings, then a clear dull overcoat.
     
    mozquito1 likes this.
  16. mozquito1

    mozquito1 Summer's over, where's my thumbless gloves

    Still sounds time consuming.
    Get some pictures up when it finished.
     
  17. Gabriel Yee

    Gabriel Yee Well-Known Member

    It might be time consuming, but it sure sounds like lots of fun!

    Don't forget to post some pictures.
     
    Chuck likes this.
  18. mozquito1

    mozquito1 Summer's over, where's my thumbless gloves

    Did you ever finish that paint job?
     
  19. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member

    Doing some modifications that I want to complete, before applying the paint. By the way. I saw some brushed motor ESC's listed on eBay. Are thry pracyical on a quad? I have a JJRC H25G, which uses the same motors as the Syma X8. Since I'm building a brushless motored quad, it makes sense to me to be able to use the same transmitter and receiver for both, as I'm looking at the Flysky I6 combination. The I6 receiver also has the advantage of dual antennas, over the single antenna on the JJRC FCB.
     

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